How to recognize some learning disabilities, and be fine

How to recognize some learning disabilities, and be fine

Perhaps you have noticed that your child struggles with school rather often. For example, he or she may seem to anticipate with great apprehension or even fear things that are simple for other kids such as reading out loud, or the process of writing an essay, or maybe when it is necessary to tackle a math problem. This may not appear simply as the type of troubles that all kids have with homework sometimes. Rather, it may appear as a recurrent problematic situation for your kid, and if that is the case, probably this is an indication that he or she may suffer from some kind of learning disability. However, this is not the end of the world. On the contrary, if you take the time to understand as well as you can all those things having to do with learning disabilities, you will indeed be in a position to help your child to overcome many classroom challenges, and become a successful person in life.

Image courtesy of Michael Havens at Flickr.com
Image courtesy of Michael Havens at Flickr.com

Learning disabilities, also known sometimes as learning disorders, appeal to different sorts of learning problems that a person may have, usually related to activities like reading and writing, listening and speaking, or doing math and reasoning about problems. However, it does not have to do with things such as the intelligence of a person or his or her lack of motivation necessarily. A child with some learning disability can be as smart and productive as any other child, or even more, because learning disabilities do not actually  refer to dumbness or laziness. They simply refer to a different configuration of a child’s brain, which has a direct impact on how he or she receives information about the external world, and the way in which he or she processes it and interprets it. So, a person with some type of learning disability can see, hear, understand, and talk about things in a way that may not be regarded as normal by most people, because it can lead to some difficulties to obtain new information about a given situation, and to develop the sort of skills that are more appropriate for it.

Yet any child with a learning disability can succeed. In fact, many become adults that have reached the kind of life that seems better for them, despite having to deal every day with their disability even as adults. So, though it can surely be tough to have to face the fact that your own child has a learning disability of any type, this situation should not be perceived as irremediable. There are always ways out of the situation, though not by means of its rejection, but rather by means of its acceptance. Your child does not have to suffer for his or her condition if you find opportunities for him or her to learn according to his or her own rhythm and needs. The important thing to keep in mind is that your child is a human being, and as any other human being, your child has his or her own interests and particularities. He or she is different from other children, and therefore what you should care about as a parent is to do your best to maximize his or her capabilities, according to what your child enjoy the most, and increase his or her options to succeed in life in that way.

Image courtesy of Yasmeen at Flickr.com
Image courtesy of Yasmeen at Flickr.com

Given this situation, it is hard to say that learning disabilities are just the same for everyone. They rather look different from one person to another. Some children may have trouble with math problems, whereas others may have problems with spelling or writing. For that reason, to identify learning disabilities can be a hard task sometimes, since they vary from one person to the other. And this means that you cannot rely simply on one symptom or profile to conclude that your child has a learning disability. You need to be careful before you reach a final conclusion about the condition of your child. However, there are some warning signs that may appear at certain ages, and that can be of help to identify whether your kid has some sort of learning disability. The sooner you identify them, the better it will be to increase the opportunities of success of your child. Though of course it is always a good idea to ask a specialist about your child once you have some idea of what is going on with him or her.

These signs and symptoms vary from one person to another, but also from one age to another. In preschool, for instance, one can identify some issues when one sees problems like pronouncing words, learning things such as the alphabet, the name of colors, numbers or shapes, or handling small objects like buttons, crayons, pencils, and so on. In ages 5 to 9, the issues may be related to learning new skills in general, and may become more prominent after the child is over ten.

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